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  • Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction, Verus Art - CultureLabel - 1
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Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction, Verus Art - CultureLabel - 1
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Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction, Verus Art - CultureLabel - 1 Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction, Verus Art - CultureLabel - 2 Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction, Verus Art - CultureLabel - 3 Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction, Verus Art - CultureLabel - 4 Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction, Verus Art - CultureLabel - 5 Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction, Verus Art - CultureLabel - 6 Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction, Verus Art - CultureLabel - 7

Woman With an Umbrella Edgar Degas 3d Reproduction

Verus Art

£2,495.00 GBP

3d Printed Artwork

Frame

About

You can own a Degas! Our re-creations are so close to the original, you can't tell the difference. A striking piece by Degas, this limited edition re-creation is sure to be a conversation starter, packed with sentiment and bold messages that challenged conventions of the era.

 

Details:

Certified Limited Edition of 950 art prints world wide. 300 North America, 300 Europe, 300 Asia, 50 Museum 
Verus Art reproductions are printed on premium aluminum panels using the highest quality archival inks


Re-creation size:

61 x 50 cm

(24 x 19.7”)

 

Custom taxes may apply on delivery.

 

Select your frame:

Salon Frame

Whitman Frame

Metro Frame

 

This re-creation has been paired with an elaborate museum selected frame, which holds true to the era that Degas painted the original piece. You can also choose from two alternatives to best coordinate with your décor.

 

About Versus Art:

Verus Art® is a synergy between new technology and traditional craftsmanship, resulting in stunning 3D printed art re-creations that can be enjoyed outside of the museum.

Our mission is to foster a love of art. With royalties from our re-creations supporting museum education and outreach programs we are also proud to be supporting art-rich education and culture by making fine art more accessible.

 

Years of research have cumulated in the ability to produce the most accurate and authentic re-creations of the greatest masterpieces in painting.

The Verus Art process utilizes the world’s most advanced 3D color laser scanning technology to capture hundreds of millions of data points to precisely calibrate the hue, saturation and brightness of each color while simultaneously measuring the relief of the great master’s brushstrokes. Once the data is analyzed and compiled, state of the art elevated printers re-create the painting.

Before authenticating the edition, the National Gallery of Canada’s Director of Conservation & Technical Research compares the master proof to the original artwork. Assessing color, saturation and brushwork texture ensures the most accurate re-creation has been achieved.

Finally, each re-creation is then completed with a premium, hand-crafted artisan frame by Larson-Juhl.

 

 

 

THE STORY BEHIND DEGAS' PAINTING

The woman depicted was likely Berthe, the wife of Degas’ friend Charles Jeantaud.  Degas portrayed her on at least two other occasions, in paintings that would also have appeared daringly modern to the contemporary viewer.   This is the most intriguing of the three pictures, with its disconcerting mixture of levels of finish, and apparently unflinching depiction of appearance and character.  While the painting has many of the trappings of a portrait, it was likely not commissioned by Berthe – instead she sat for the eccentric Degas perhaps at his request – certainly he afterwards kept the painting.

She was painted over an abandoned image of a standing female figure – perhaps a nursemaid or a domestic servant; the figure’s hand, cuff and dark sleeve can still be seen on Berthe’s chest, and the green tone visible in many areas is that of the original background.  Degas scraped this painting down with a palette knife, but did not apply a paint layer to cover the first painting and instead worked directly over it.

While the rough finish and gestural brushwork would suggest rapid and inspired work, Degas himself claimed to know nothing of spontaneity, and instead prized reflection and study.   Among the avant-garde artists of his generation, he had the most classical training and solid technical underpinnings.  While this work is experimental, and would have looked breathtakingly progressive to his viewers, everything about it is cleverly considered.   By leaving some areas unresolved and pushing others to further levels of finish, he forces us to ask fundamental questions about the way the external world can be represented, and where reality resides.  The calculated technical extravagance of this painting shows the painter to be a masterful manipulator of vision, and a critical influence for subsequent generations of artists.

 


 

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